Home » Dicks Works Volume 7 by Thomas Dick
Dicks Works Volume 7 Thomas Dick

Dicks Works Volume 7

Thomas Dick

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230367187
Paperback
118 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ...the star No. 964 inMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1840 edition. Excerpt: ...the star No. 964 in Mayers catalogue had been unobserved by others, and observed only once by Mayer himself, so that no motion could have been perceived by him. On this Mr. Bode immediately directed his telescope to that part of the heavens where he might expect to find it, but without success. At the same time he found, by calculation, that its apparent place in the year 1756 ought to have been that of Mayers star, and this was one of the years in which he was busied in his observations- and, on farther inquiry, it was found that the star 964 had been discovered by Mayer on the 15th of September, 1756- so that it is now believed that this star was the new planet of Herschel. It appears likewise that this star was seen several times by Flamstead, the astronomer royal, in the year 1690- once by Bradley- and eleven times by Lemonnier- all of whom considered it as one of the fixed stars, but never suspected that it was a planetary body. The discovery of this planet enlarges our views of the extent of the solar system, and of the quantity of matter it contains, far more than if planets equal to Mercury, Venus, the Earth, the Moon. Mars, Vesta, Juno, Ceres, and Pallas, were to be added to that system- for, although it is scarcely distinguishable by the naked eye on the vault of heaven, it is more than twenty times larger than all these bodies taken together. After this body was ascertained to belong to the planetary system, it became a subject of consideration by what name it should be distinguished. The old planets were distinguished by names borrowed from the heathen deities, a nomenclature, which, perhaps, it might now be expedient to change- but Galileo and Cassini gave to the celestial bodies they discovered the names of the princes who...