Home » Relational Reflexology Supporting Sub-Fertility Clients: A Practitioner Guide by Nichola Gregory
Relational Reflexology Supporting Sub-Fertility Clients: A Practitioner Guide Nichola Gregory

Relational Reflexology Supporting Sub-Fertility Clients: A Practitioner Guide

Nichola Gregory

Published June 1st 2013
ISBN : 9781489569523
Paperback
180 pages
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 About the Book 

In Reflexology fortunately, there are highly trained, professionally rigourous practitioners out there. And it is to encourage more of them that this book, along with its accompanying training scheme, is now introduced. The books gifted authorMoreIn Reflexology fortunately, there are highly trained, professionally rigourous practitioners out there. And it is to encourage more of them that this book, along with its accompanying training scheme, is now introduced. The books gifted author Nichola Gregory is not only herself a prime example of such rigorous training, but she has had the courage to declare herself in print to insist on the raising of standards professionally in her chosen field. As a relational reflexologist working in private practice she is in an ideal position to persuade students to take the long, hard road to real qualification. Their certificate of accreditation will mean a true measure of expertise, ensuring that graduates take with them into their new practice a level of integrity and education bearing no comparison with those weekend trainees still plying their trade out there. Nicholas passionate belief in improving both the standards of practice in reflexology per se, but also in training practitioners specifically who work with clients with sub-fertility issues, shine through this book. Recognising the vulnerability of such women, the need for extreme care in honouring ethical responsibility to them, is clearly a primary concern of hers. Movingly describing the isolation women feel when they have difficulty in conceiving a longed-for child, their bewilderment and distress, Nichola writes with great compassion and she uses their reported words in one chapter to great effect. She writes too of clinical, psychological and medical matters in a manner both clear and helpful. This is not only a thoughtful book, it is a timely one. Her fascinating research into the rise and fall of the ancient healing arts, where Christianity dealt them a near-terminal blow in the Middle Ages, compounded by scientists in later centuries, who nearly (but not quite) wiped esoteric knowledge off the board, is traced compellingly.That titanic clash between science and the ancient healing arts is, however, at long last beginning a new phase. Tentative it may be, but far more accepting of others views, now that consciousness is coming more to the fore again. We have complementary therapy as part of our twenty first century lexicon, where qualified practitioners in all alternative disciplines are sometimes welcome to work in tandem with modern medicine. This is a good enough compromise to be going on with, each side actually acknowledging the value of the other. More doctors than ever appear to be accepting alternative healing methods (Chinese medical herbs- acupuncture- osteopathy- homeopathy- reflexology and so on), either because they are finally enlightened or overworked, or a bit of both. All this despite the anti-lobby, unhelpful whatever their rationale, be it political, fiscal or expedient. I believe there is hope for the future, when appropriate national registration and accreditation in all fields of complementary therapy will give more confidence to orthodox medical practitioners and thence the general public. But that hope for a more holistic approach to healing cannot become a reality unless and until complementary therapies are given the status they deserve. How do practitioners achieve such status? By embarking on a proper education for them and preparing to meet demanding criteria in their chosen healing discipline. Here I would flag up my personal crusade: to encourage students in all complementary therapies to learn basic listening skills, sign on for a foundation course (at the very least) in counselling from an accredited training body, and to follow Nicholas own lead in taking her earlier studies to the next level. May her book inspire students to do just that, ultimately to contribute their excellent professionalism to the entire field of complementary therapy. Rosie March-Smith Reflexology/psychoneuroimmunology/stress/touch/therapeutic relationship/existential thinking/practitioner self-awareness/supervision/